The Artwork

Artists from around Hackney who feel invisible in their day-to-day lives created pieces especially for this exhibition. The work was displayed in Stoke Newington until July 10th 2022.  

A limited number of prints (as well as cups and plates produced by young people at Stormont House School) are on sale - pop into Revere the Residence, Rouge and Know and Love (details below).

All proceeds will go to the artists themselves - some artists have gifted their work and have asked for their proceeds to go to Stoke Newington Business Association to help with the running of next year's Invisible People Art Trail.

How to Buy

The trail has now ended. A limited number of prints are available to buy in Revere the Residence.  

Unframed prints: A4 (£20) and A3 (£30).

A small number of original artworks are also available. Price on enquiry.

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Psycho Delia

"Further to music, as a crafty maker I am using my experience of parenthood with its abundance of plastic detritus, to fashion all I have accumulated over a 7 year period, into my stage jewellery and costume. Flash Trash.
Invisible Stokey is giving me an exciting opportunity to be part of a community, instead of often feeling outside of everything.
Being a solo parent to an only child, whilst trying to retain my former creative identity, as an international gigging musician and performer, is a constant juggling act.

Women are still predominantly the primary carers. Independent artists and lone parents, often don’t have the time needed to support their own artistic practise, or make enough income to feed their family or pay for childcare. The guilt!

When my daughter was a baby, I started collecting formula spoons and bottles, milk carton ring pulls, puree pouch lids with a view to making something out of them, (hoarder-mentality) instead of binning/recycling.
A positive about plastics is how colourful it is and as a maximalist, obsessed with pattern and colour, I was able to fashion some fab stage items including a wig, several necklaces and a bra top, whilst my daughter was asleep (songwriting = too loud)

My mother instilled this interest in colour in me and the connection with a more positive daily mental attitude.
Dressing colourfully and boldly truly makes me feel good. And very visible."

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Lesley

In 2017 Lesley, an established ceramicist based in Stoke Newington, was diagnosed with Stage 3 inoperable Cervical Cancer and has undergone several radiations and chemotherapy.

She said: “Calling myself the “Punk Potter” has given the public preconceptions about my character, and professionalism, and although I like it, I think people are quite judgemental, and expect me to be either aggressive, or just not take me very seriously. Now my hair is purple, and I am the “Purple Punk Potter” it does sound quite silly; however, I do always try to present myself as an established and of course very professional ceramicist first and Punk Potter second.
The workshop Units have always been closed to the public, so it has been a very isolated and Invisible struggle to get to the place I am today.”

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HIP

Hackney Independent Parent Carer Forum (HiP) - a group of parents in Hackney who volunteer to connect to the wider SEND community. The artwork presented has been submitted by their Autism Girls Group HiP, from an eclectic group of Children and Young People with additional needs.

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Abstract 1

Louise

Originally from East Yorkshire and living with Bi Polar. Invisibility for me is quite strong. I’ve lived in London for 22 years and the cultural difference has lead me to feel lonely, isolated and invisible. I lead a quiet life and spend a lot of time alone.

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Abstract Circles

Yvonne

Yvonne developed an RSI from overuse of the keyboard 30 years ago and has never regained the full use of her hands. It has limited her employment opportunities and her ability to be creative. She had to give up playing the guitar and painting. She said: Recently, I discovered gel painting. The beauty of this technique is that, compared to painting, it's not as repetitive and I can switch hands when one of them gets too tired."

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Apple

Imogen

Imogen is 13 and autistic.

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Beings

Cleo

Cleo is a stargazer who loves astronomy and this inspires some of her work. She had a horseback archery accident in 2008 and suffered a chronic back injury . She said:"people don't see my constant pain - especially when I can't leave the house."

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Blue dress - white hat

Piper

Piper is an artist from Stoke Newington,
she is profoundly deaf and autistic with a creative talent to be truly jealous of.
Her art is packed full of passion with themes of relationships, love and break ups, all illustrated in her unique and expressive style.
“I love drawing it helps me take it easy with my wobbly balance”
When in doubt be like Piper and remember to revere the little things in life.

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By Dandy - 2

Dandy

I am a multidisciplinary artist whose practice was subjected to an unforeseen shift after the sudden loss of my mother in 2019. Forced to discover the multi-faceted powers of grief and loss, my approach has since evolved into an autobiographical glimpse of childhood and identity pre- and post- my mother’s passing.

I believe grief can make one feel invisible. Perhaps when you're at the pub, grabbing a coffee, having a browse in a shop, grief is always bearing heavy on your shoulders. I wanted to submit my paintings to this art trail because I believe in this setting my paintings will reflect how grief can be overlooked on a daily basis.

My most recent painting series comes from youtube screenshots of the world gymnastic final in 1975. In the footage, somewhere far in the distance, you can occasionally get a glimpse of my mother; a very blurry ten year old runner for the event. These low quality pictures/paintings had a haunting impact on me as I try to digest life and death in one image.

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By Dandy - 5

Dandy

I am a multidisciplinary artist whose practice was subjected to an unforeseen shift after the sudden loss of my mother in 2019. Forced to discover the multi-faceted powers of grief and loss, my approach has since evolved into an autobiographical glimpse of childhood and identity pre- and post- my mother’s passing.

I believe grief can make one feel invisible. Perhaps when you're at the pub, grabbing a coffee, having a browse in a shop, grief is always bearing heavy on your shoulders. I wanted to submit my paintings to this art trail because I believe in this setting my paintings will reflect how grief can be overlooked on a daily basis.

My most recent painting series comes from youtube screenshots of the world gymnastic final in 1975. In the footage, somewhere far in the distance, you can occasionally get a glimpse of my mother; a very blurry ten year old runner for the event. These low quality pictures/paintings had a haunting impact on me as I try to digest life and death in one image.

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Caraf

Nicola

'All of my artwork I have produced in the last year was to help get me out of my depression after being made homeless during Lockdown. I have suffered Anxiety and Depression since Primary School which can sabotage and impair my ability to have a meaningful life, having security and stability, being a successful artist and to experience joy. I have quite often hidden this from others due to stigma and fear which has often rendered me feeling invisible and not part of society. This can lead to abandoning myself and my talents, the erosion of my self confidence, periods of isolation, lost friendships and also a rebound of periods of high productivity that can lead to burnout. It can be exhausting, debilitating, disempowering, frustrating and upsetting and I believe prevents my Art becoming my profession. I always turn to my art to help pull me out and to persevere.'

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Comic Strip

Susie

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Da

Jackson

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Dolphins

Beth

Beth is 21, draws from her imagination of her favourite things, family, flowers, butterflies and multipacks or the occasional spider to scare her siblings. She has down syndrome and a wicked sense of humour
She said: “When I do my painting it does relax me. People might like my pictures, I feel happy.”

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Faces

Louise

Originally from East Yorkshire and living with Bi Polar. Invisibility for me is quite strong. I’ve lived in London for 22 years and the cultural difference has lead me to feel lonely, isolated and invisible. I lead a quiet life and spend a lot of time alone.

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Flamingo

Imogen

Imogen is 13 and autistic.

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Flowers

Beth

Beth is 21, draws from her imagination of her favourite things, family, flowers, butterflies and multipacks or the occasional spider to scare her siblings. She has down syndrome and a wicked sense of humour
She said: “When I do my painting it does relax me. People might like my pictures, I feel happy.”

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Footballers

Piper

Piper is an artist from Stoke Newington,
she is profoundly deaf and autistic with a creative talent to be truly jealous of.
Her art is packed full of passion with themes of relationships, love and break ups, all illustrated in her unique and expressive style.
“I love drawing it helps me take it easy with my wobbly balance”
When in doubt be like Piper and remember to revere the little things in life.

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Giraffe

Imogen

Imogen is 13 and autistic.

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Happiness

St John and St James

The children decided to create artwork based on their identities so they feel seen. They took a picture of themselves and collaged bright colours within their silhouette and around it took. They then found images of things they love and things that make them them. They had a great time creating their art and are very excited to share their work and their personalities with you.

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It Clown

Beth

Beth is 21, draws from her imagination of her favourite things, family, flowers, butterflies and multipacks or the occasional spider to scare her siblings. She has down syndrome and a wicked sense of humour
“When I do my painting it does relax me. People might like my pictures, I feel happy.”

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Just Relax

Piper

Piper is an artist from Stoke Newington,
she is profoundly deaf and autistic with a creative talent to be truly jealous of.
Her art is packed full of passion with themes of relationships, love and break ups, all illustrated in her unique and expressive style.
She said: “I love drawing it helps me take it easy with my wobbly balance.”
When in doubt be like Piper and remember to revere the little things in life.

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Life is Better with Chocolate Toast

Lula

"People don’t see the real me. They don’t look hard enough. They just see a weirdo when all I’m doing is enjoying myself jumping in puddles, collecting stones and playing. I wish people could see me like I see myself. I don’t want to rush them but if they don’t hurry up and change I’m going to be really lonely. I mean I just don’t want to feel shamed and left in lots of peoples shadows." Lula, 17 non-binary and autistic.

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Lost in the Jungle

Djona

Djoina was diagnosed with cancer at a young age. "The disease left me with diverse complications and problems, which are not visible and make everyday life a bit more complicated. This experience made me feel different from the other kids but also helped me be stronger and more creative.

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Mask Rug 1

Graham

Graham, who has a degree in textiles and fashion, became obsessed with rug hooking during the pandemic. He said: I am invisible because very few people have seen my work in the flesh.
“Being involved in ‘Invisible People – See you in Stokey is like a first step into a new world for me and my creations.”
All his pieces are made of recycled materials – fabric from clothing and backed with old coffee sacks.

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Mermaid

Piper

Piper is an artist from Stoke Newington,
she is profoundly deaf and autistic with a creative talent to be truly jealous of.
Her art is packed full of passion with themes of relationships, love and break ups, all illustrated in her unique and expressive style.
She said: “I love drawing it helps me take it easy with my wobbly balance.”
When in doubt be like Piper and remember to revere the little things in life.

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Multipacks

Beth

Beth is 21, draws from her imagination of her favourite things, family, flowers, butterflies and multipacks or the occasional spider to scare her siblings. She has down syndrome and a wicked sense of humour
She said: “When I do my painting it does relax me. People might like my pictures, I feel happy.”

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My Gronk Nuts

Piper

Piper is an artist from Stoke Newington,
she is profoundly deaf and autistic with a creative talent to be truly jealous of.
Her art is packed full of passion with themes of relationships, love and break ups, all illustrated in her unique and expressive style.
“I love drawing it helps me take it easy with my wobbly balance”
When in doubt be like Piper and remember to revere the little things in life.

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Painting

Hattie

“When I was 6 years old I was diagnosed with dyslexia. I struggled to read, write, spell and perform simple mathematics. I was in the bottom sets and classes all the way through school and high school, I was asked by teachers “when would I learn how to spell?”. There was a strong possibility that I wasn’t going to pass my GCSE’S and A levels. My dream was to go to Arts University therefore I had to put in double the amount of work and time to get the grades.
From a very young age art has been my escape and my passion. I have always had a love for drawing and being creative. This led me to study graphic design at Norwich University of the arts. Since graduating in 2020 I have become a page designer for a newspaper business and started my own Freelance business and shop Hattie’s Print’s.
I truly believe that without having dyslexia I would visually see my surroundings very differently and wouldn’t be in the position I am today. Therefore I see it as a strength and not a disability.”

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Piper & Huxley

Piper

Piper is an artist from Stoke Newington,
she is profoundly deaf and autistic with a creative talent to be truly jealous of.
Her art is packed full of passion with themes of relationships, love and break ups, all illustrated in her unique and expressive style.
“I love drawing it helps me take it easy with my wobbly balance”
When in doubt be like Piper and remember to revere the little things in life.

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Piper - colour

Piper

Piper is an artist from Stoke Newington,
she is profoundly deaf and autistic with a creative talent to be truly jealous of.
Her art is packed full of passion with themes of relationships, love and break ups, all illustrated in her unique and expressive style.
“I love drawing it helps me take it easy with my wobbly balance”
When in doubt be like Piper and remember to revere the little things in life.

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Piper, Acer, Owly, Isaac and Huxley

Piper

Piper is an artist from Stoke Newington,
she is profoundly deaf and autistic with a creative talent to be truly jealous of.
Her art is packed full of passion with themes of relationships, love and break ups, all illustrated in her unique and expressive style.
“I love drawing it helps me take it easy with my wobbly balance”
When in doubt be like Piper and remember to revere the little things in life.

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Push Bike

Lino

"My art makes me happy." Lino is profoundly deaf from meningitis. When Lino creates his work he grins from ear to ear.

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Ronaldo

Lino

"My art makes me happy." Lino is profoundly deaf from meningitis. When Lino creates his work he grins from ear to ear.

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Self Portrait - Lino

Lino

"My art makes me happy." Lino is profoundly deaf from meningitis. When Lino creates his work he grins from ear to ear.

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Spider

Beth

Beth is 21, draws from her imagination of her favourite things, family, flowers, butterflies and multipacks or the occasional spider to scare her siblings. She has down syndrome and a wicked sense of humour
She said: “When I do my painting it does relax me. People might like my pictures, I feel happy.”

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Stokey

Nicola

"All of my artwork I have produced in the last year was to help get me out of my depression after being made homeless during Lockdown. I have suffered Anxiety and Depression since Primary School which can sabotage and impair my ability to have a meaningful life, having security and stability, being a successful artist and to experience joy. I have quite often hidden this from others due to stigma and fear which has often rendered me feeling invisible and not part of society. This can lead to abandoning myself and my talents, the erosion of my self confidence, periods of isolation, lost friendships and also a rebound of periods of high productivity that can lead to burnout. It can be exhausting, debilitating, disempowering, frustrating and upsetting and I believe prevents my Art becoming my profession. I always turn to my art to help pull me out and to persevere."

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Sunburn with Friends

Florence

Florence makes rugs that desexualise nudity and make it funny. Her invisibility is an eating disorder you can not see.

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The Easter Bunny

Piper

Piper is an artist from Stoke Newington,
she is profoundly deaf and autistic with a creative talent to be truly jealous of.
Her art is packed full of passion with themes of relationships, love and break ups, all illustrated in her unique and expressive style.
She said: “I love drawing it helps me take it easy with my wobbly balance.”
When in doubt be like Piper and remember to revere the little things in life.

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Tony, Hux, Piper, Beth

Piper

Piper is an artist from Stoke Newington,
she is profoundly deaf and autistic with a creative talent to be truly jealous of.
Her art is packed full of passion with themes of relationships, love and break ups, all illustrated in her unique and expressive style.
She said: “I love drawing it helps me take it easy with my wobbly balance.”
When in doubt be like Piper and remember to revere the little things in life.

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Unseen

Lya

I suppose there are many ways that you can be invisible. Ethnicity, gender, age, social circumstances, disabilities (visible and invisible and body shape are factors that might be at the root of my particular blend of invisibility.

So I sit undisturbed at local parks and paint. I love the simple, ephemeral unkept beauty in nature. Being invisible taught me to appreciate these things.

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Wall Hanging 2

Tashi

“I have Adenomyosis, a chronic illness that can affect anyone born with a uterus – I’d hadn’t heard of it before I was diagnosed. I often feel that women’s health goes unacknowledged. It is the thing that makes me feel invisible, to have something so unknown, hidden and under-researched has been scary.
I have found the process of sewing my experiences very therapeutic , whilst also educating those around me on something that was previously invisible to them.”

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Water Lilies

Lya

I suppose there are many ways that you can be invisible. Ethnicity, gender, age, social circumstances, disabilities (visible and invisible and body shape are factors that might be at the root of my particular blend of invisibility.

So I sit undisturbed at local parks and paint. I love the simple, ephemeral unkept beauty in nature. Being invisible taught me to appreciate these things.

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Wolf

Beth

Beth is 21, draws from her imagination of her favourite things, family, flowers, butterflies and multipacks or the occasional spider to scare her siblings. She has down syndrome and a wicked sense of humour
She said: “When I do my painting it does relax me. People might like my pictures, I feel happy.”

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Yellow Mother

Sana

Sana is a South Asian artist, poet, designer and flower enthusiast, living In Hackney. When not painting she runs a poetry newsletter called Found Poems. It took a long time for her to find her way back to art in the absence of seeing visible examples of Indian artists being active and celebrated in the London art scene. She hopes that by sharing her work she can be that visible sign for others looking to commit to art.

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Lesley

In 2017 Lesley, an established ceramicist based in Stoke Newington, was diagnosed with Stage 3 inoperable Cervical Cancer and has undergone several radiations and chemotherapy.

She said: “Calling myself the “Punk Potter” has given the public preconceptions about my character, and professionalism, and although I like it, I think people are quite judgemental, and expect me to be either aggressive, or just not take me very seriously. Now my hair is purple, and I am the “Purple Punk Potter” it does sound quite silly; however, I do always try to present myself as an established and of course very professional ceramicist first and Punk Potter second.
The workshop Units have always been closed to the public, so it has been a very isolated and Invisible struggle to get to the place I am today.”

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Ganna

Ganna grew up in Ukraine and moved here 12 years ago. She said: “As a young artist and an immigrant, I have felt quite out of space all the way through my studies at the University. I was occupied with travelling home every term and whenever I had an opportunity. I was divided in parts with two lives one in London and another in my home town - Donetsk. She has a BA Illustration & Animation degree at Kingston University.
Raised by her grandmother, Ganna lived through the war in Ukraine in 2014. At the age of 27 she was diagnosed as under the bio polar spectrum.

She added: “I am now learning how to live with it and am very lucky to have my family strongly supporting me in all ways. I continue to create art to communicate my ideas. I continue my voyage of search for my place in a creative world.”

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A Box

M

“A flower is a flower before the scientific community has the chance to gift it with a Latin name. Regardless of consensus, it simply exists. And while the majority decides whether to propagate or expunge it, the flower doesn’t make a case for its existence – it just continues to grow. Sometimes I wish I could be more like a flower.
On a personal level, as I start to share my ‘real’ pronouns – against a political backdrop in which transness is debated at dinner tables across the UK – I feel nervous. The disclosure of this basic information – no more interesting than a name or an age, are always met with questions both barbed and well-meaning. You need to arm yourself with so many watertight arguments that it’s easy to forget that you exist. Lately I’ve noticed myself lose hours to research, not for my own growth but as a knowledge base to justify my existence. This can make a person miserable.
Instead, as I begin to share more of myself with those whose opinions dictate my success – at work, in activism and maybe even among friends, I have resolved to abandon logic. I exist, regardless of who wins the fight, so I may as well grow where I please.”

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Abstract 2

Louise

Originally from East Yorkshire and living with Bi Polar. Invisibility for me is quite strong. I’ve lived in London for 22 years and the cultural difference has lead me to feel lonely, isolated and invisible. I lead a quiet life and spend a lot of time alone.

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Alien 1

Fabrizio

"Even the most visible people can feel invisible. I’m a foreigner gay guy, grown up in a small village in the middle of Sardinia and happily adopted by London 10 years ago. Since I was a kid I’ve always felt different, felt not seen for who I really was. With time your mask becomes you, and you lose touch with the person within, so even through the years that feeling sometimes emerges. Despite the big achievements in the past 20 years, being gay is still complex. It eradicates to a subtle but omnipresent shame of who we really are. We seek attention and validation to fulfil what is missing, what we never had from society, that’s why I/we feel invisible."

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At the Gym

Beth

Beth is 21, draws from her imagination of her favourite things, family, flowers, butterflies and multipacks or the occasional spider to scare her siblings. She has down syndrome and a wicked sense of humour
She said: “When I do my painting it does relax me. People might like my pictures, I feel happy.”

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Bird

Suzie

Suzie's mum Jo said: "I'm not sure Suzie feels invisible, in fact everyone who knows her would say that's far from the case. It's really my concern that as a woman with learning disabilities my daughter cannot use social media without help and she as a vulnerable adult, could be a person at risk. Because of her disability she is excluded from many areas of life, which most people take for granted."

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Butterflies and Beth

Beth

Beth is 21, draws from her imagination of her favourite things, family, flowers, butterflies and multipacks or the occasional spider to scare her siblings. She has down syndrome and a wicked sense of humour
She said: “When I do my painting it does relax me. People might like my pictures, I feel happy.”

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By Dandy - 3

Dandy

I am a multidisciplinary artist whose practice was subjected to an unforeseen shift after the sudden loss of my mother in 2019. Forced to discover the multi-faceted powers of grief and loss, my approach has since evolved into an autobiographical glimpse of childhood and identity pre- and post- my mother’s passing.

I believe grief can make one feel invisible. Perhaps when you're at the pub, grabbing a coffee, having a browse in a shop, grief is always bearing heavy on your shoulders. I wanted to submit my paintings to this art trail because I believe in this setting my paintings will reflect how grief can be overlooked on a daily basis.

My most recent painting series comes from youtube screenshots of the world gymnastic final in 1975. In the footage, somewhere far in the distance, you can occasionally get a glimpse of my mother; a very blurry ten year old runner for the event. These low quality pictures/paintings had a haunting impact on me as I try to digest life and death in one image.

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By Dandy - 6

Dandy

I am a multidisciplinary artist whose practice was subjected to an unforeseen shift after the sudden loss of my mother in 2019. Forced to discover the multi-faceted powers of grief and loss, my approach has since evolved into an autobiographical glimpse of childhood and identity pre- and post- my mother’s passing.

I believe grief can make one feel invisible. Perhaps when you're at the pub, grabbing a coffee, having a browse in a shop, grief is always bearing heavy on your shoulders. I wanted to submit my paintings to this art trail because I believe in this setting my paintings will reflect how grief can be overlooked on a daily basis.

My most recent painting series comes from youtube screenshots of the world gymnastic final in 1975. In the footage, somewhere far in the distance, you can occasionally get a glimpse of my mother; a very blurry ten year old runner for the event. These low quality pictures/paintings had a haunting impact on me as I try to digest life and death in one image.

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Chair 1

Kristina

Kristina left Kyiv Ukraine, her homeland, in February 2022 during the Ukraine war. She is a member of the internationally recognised Ukrainian Women's Photography organisation. She now lives and works in Hackney, East London.

She said: "When war broke out my world fell apart. I became a shell of myself without any safety or protection. I couldn't have imagined that this would be possible in my country or that I could become a refugee. I felt unsafe to stay in Ukraine and made the journey to London via Warsaw. My family and friends are still in Ukraine and I fear for their wellbeing every day. Now in London I am trying to rebuild my life with the help of Homes For Ukraine. I hope I can support my family at home."

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Crockery by Stormont House

Stormont House

Artists Henny Beaumont and Brigit Connolly have been working with local special needs school Stormont House to produce plates and mugs with students’ artwork.

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Disappearing Act

Lya

I suppose there are many ways that you can be invisible. Ethnicity, gender, age, social circumstances, disabilities (visible and invisible and body shape are factors that might be at the root of my particular blend of invisibility.

So I sit undisturbed at local parks and paint. I love the simple, ephemeral unkept beauty in nature. Being invisible taught me to appreciate these things.

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Easter Bunny, Santa and the Sandman (and Piper)

Piper

Piper is an artist from Stoke Newington,
she is profoundly deaf and autistic with a creative talent to be truly jealous of.
Her art is packed full of passion with themes of relationships, love and break ups, all illustrated in her unique and expressive style.
“I love drawing it helps me take it easy with my wobbly balance”
When in doubt be like Piper and remember to revere the little things in life.

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Family

Beth

Beth is 21, draws from her imagination of her favourite things, family, flowers, butterflies and multipacks or the occasional spider to scare her siblings. She has down syndrome and a wicked sense of humour
She said: “When I do my painting it does relax me. People might like my pictures, I feel happy.”

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Flower Embrace

Djoina

Djoina was diagnosed with cancer at a young age. "The disease left me with diverse complications and problems, which are not visible and make everyday life a bit more complicated. This experience made me feel different from the other kids but also helped me be stronger and more creative.

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Flowers on Blue

Dee G

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Fox Portrait

GH

Bio to follow!

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Girls Singing Japanese Pop Songs

Piper

Piper is an artist from Stoke Newington,
she is profoundly deaf and autistic with a creative talent to be truly jealous of.
Her art is packed full of passion with themes of relationships, love and break ups, all illustrated in her unique and expressive style.
She said: “I love drawing it helps me take it easy with my wobbly balance.”
When in doubt be like Piper and remember to revere the little things in life.

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Home

Suzie

Suzie's mum Jo said: "I'm not sure Suzie feels invisible, in fact everyone who knows her would say that's far from the case. It's really my concern that as a woman with learning disabilities my daughter cannot use social media without help and she as a vulnerable adult, could be a person at risk. Because of her disability she is excluded from many areas of life, which most people take for granted."

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Joe Davis

Beth

Beth is 21, draws from her imagination of her favourite things, family, flowers, butterflies and multipacks or the occasional spider to scare her siblings. She has down syndrome and a wicked sense of humour
She said: “When I do my painting it does relax me. People might like my pictures, I feel happy.”

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Knife, Fork, Spoon

LK

“I feel invisible because…
I chose to be,
Protection anxiety,
‘The Invisible Man’
Self PRO fo’ see,
survival shifted thru life til,
shame locked me up
I’ll be back til I stop.”

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Linnea

Linnea

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Lovers

Bee

"In a world that constantly requires you to assert yourself, to debate, explain and justify your existence, it's ok to just be. Queer joy is a radical act. Queer joy is defiance and queer joy is resistance."

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Mask Rug 3

Graham

Graham, who has a degree in textiles and fashion, became obsessed with rug hooking during the pandemic. He said: I am invisible because very few people have seen my work in the flesh.
“Being involved in ‘Invisible People – See you in Stokey is like a first step into a new world for me and my creations.”
All his pieces are made of recycled materials – fabric from clothing and backed with old coffee sacks.

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Messi

Lino

"My art makes me happy." Lino is profoundly deaf from meningitis. When Lino creates his work he grins from ear to ear.

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My Dad - My Mum

Beth

Beth is 21, draws from her imagination of her favourite things, family, flowers, butterflies and multipacks or the occasional spider to scare her siblings. She has down syndrome and a wicked sense of humour
She said: “When I do my painting it does relax me. People might like my pictures, I feel happy.”

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Nude

Nicola

"All of my artwork I have produced in the last year was to help get me out of my depression after being made homeless during Lockdown. I have suffered Anxiety and Depression since Primary School which can sabotage and impair my ability to have a meaningful life, having security and stability, being a successful artist and to experience joy. I have quite often hidden this from others due to stigma and fear which has often rendered me feeling invisible and not part of society. This can lead to abandoning myself and my talents, the erosion of my self confidence, periods of isolation, lost friendships and also a rebound of periods of high productivity that can lead to burnout. It can be exhausting, debilitating, disempowering, frustrating and upsetting and I believe prevents my Art becoming my profession. I always turn to my art to help pull me out and to persevere."

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Parrot

Dixie-Rae

Dixie-Rae is 7 years old and was diagnosed with autism last year. She says creating art makes her feel free.

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Piper & Tony

Piper

Piper is an artist from Stoke Newington,
she is profoundly deaf and autistic with a creative talent to be truly jealous of.
Her art is packed full of passion with themes of relationships, love and break ups, all illustrated in her unique and expressive style.
“I love drawing it helps me take it easy with my wobbly balance”
When in doubt be like Piper and remember to revere the little things in life.

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Piper and a Rabbit

Piper

Piper is an artist from Stoke Newington,
she is profoundly deaf and autistic with a creative talent to be truly jealous of.
Her art is packed full of passion with themes of relationships, love and break ups, all illustrated in her unique and expressive style.
“I love drawing it helps me take it easy with my wobbly balance”
When in doubt be like Piper and remember to revere the little things in life.

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Piper, Hux, Beth

Piper

Piper is an artist from Stoke Newington,
she is profoundly deaf and autistic with a creative talent to be truly jealous of.
Her art is packed full of passion with themes of relationships, love and break ups, all illustrated in her unique and expressive style.
“I love drawing it helps me take it easy with my wobbly balance”
When in doubt be like Piper and remember to revere the little things in life.

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Red Pepper

Imogen

Imogen is 13 and autistic.

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Sandman

Piper

Piper is an artist from Stoke Newington,
she is profoundly deaf and autistic with a creative talent to be truly jealous of.
Her art is packed full of passion with themes of relationships, love and break ups, all illustrated in her unique and expressive style.
“I love drawing it helps me take it easy with my wobbly balance”
When in doubt be like Piper and remember to revere the little things in life.

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Smiley

Stormont House

Artists Henny Beaumont and Brigit Connolly have been working with local special needs school Stormont House to produce plates and mugs with students’ artwork.

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Squirrel and Mouse

HIP

Hackney Independent Parent Carer Forum (HiP) - a group of parents in Hackney who volunteer to connect to the wider SEND community. The artwork presented has been submitted by their Autism Girls Group HiP, from an eclectic group of Children and Young People with additional needs.

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Stormont Ceramics

Stormont House

Artists Henny Beaumont and Brigit Connolly have been working with local special needs school Stormont House to produce plates and mugs with students’ artwork.

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Super Hero

Ray

Inspired by his African upbringing in Hackney and travels through Africa, Ray L aspires to create art that people from all backgrounds can get excited about. Afrofuturistic digital artist, musician, music producer, print artist, thinker, comedy tinkerer, walker, eater.

He said: "As a black person, our inner and outer beauty is often removed from the stories in which we appear. To the extent that who we are is invisible to many. When our humanity is removed, we become invisible and feared.
I wish to amplify a narrative in which black people’s beauty is celebrated. Visible to all.”

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This too Shall Pass

Bee

"In a world that constantly requires you to assert yourself, to debate, explain and justify your existence, it's ok to just be. Queer joy is a radical act. Queer joy is defiance and queer joy is resistance."

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Tooth Fairy

Piper

Piper is an artist from Stoke Newington,
she is profoundly deaf and autistic with a creative talent to be truly jealous of.
Her art is packed full of passion with themes of relationships, love and break ups, all illustrated in her unique and expressive style.
“I love drawing it helps me take it easy with my wobbly balance”
When in doubt be like Piper and remember to revere the little things in life.

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Wales

Beth

Beth is 21, draws from her imagination of her favourite things, family, flowers, butterflies and multipacks or the occasional spider to scare her siblings. She has down syndrome and a wicked sense of humour
She said: “When I do my painting it does relax me. People might like my pictures, I feel happy.”

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Wall Hanging 3

Tashi

“I have Adenomyosis, a chronic illness that can affect anyone born with a uterus – I’d hadn’t heard of it before I was diagnosed. I often feel that women’s health goes unacknowledged. It is the thing that makes me feel invisible, to have something so unknown, hidden and under-researched has been scary.
I have found the process of sewing my experiences very therapeutic , whilst also educating those around me on something that was previously invisible to them.”

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West Reservoir

Lya

I suppose there are many ways that you can be invisible. Ethnicity, gender, age, social circumstances, disabilities (visible and invisible and body shape are factors that might be at the root of my particular blend of invisibility.

So I sit undisturbed at local parks and paint. I love the simple, ephemeral unkept beauty in nature. Being invisible taught me to appreciate these things.

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Wolf and Flowers

Beth

Beth is 21, draws from her imagination of her favourite things, family, flowers, butterflies and multipacks or the occasional spider to scare her siblings. She has down syndrome and a wicked sense of humour
She said: “When I do my painting it does relax me. People might like my pictures, I feel happy.”

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You are Enough

Bee

"In a world that constantly requires you to assert yourself, to debate, explain and justify your existence, it's ok to just be. Queer joy is a radical act. Queer joy is defiance and queer joy is resistance."

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Lesley

In 2017 Lesley, an established ceramicist based in Stoke Newington, was diagnosed with Stage 3 inoperable Cervical Cancer and has undergone several radiations and chemotherapy.

She said: “Calling myself the “Punk Potter” has given the public preconceptions about my character, and professionalism, and although I like it, I think people are quite judgemental, and expect me to be either aggressive, or just not take me very seriously. Now my hair is purple, and I am the “Purple Punk Potter” it does sound quite silly; however, I do always try to present myself as an established and of course very professional ceramicist first and Punk Potter second.
The workshop Units have always been closed to the public, so it has been a very isolated and Invisible struggle to get to the place I am today.”

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Ganna

Ganna grew up in Ukraine and moved here 12 years ago. She said: “As a young artist and an immigrant, I have felt quite out of space all the way through my studies at the University. I was occupied with travelling home every term and whenever I had an opportunity. I was divided in parts with two lives one in London and another in my home town - Donetsk. She has a BA Illustration & Animation degree at Kingston University.
Raised by her grandmother, Ganna lived through the war in Ukraine in 2014. At the age of 27 she was diagnosed as under the bio polar spectrum.

She added: “I am now learning how to live with it and am very lucky to have my family strongly supporting me in all ways. I continue to create art to communicate my ideas. I continue my voyage of search for my place in a creative world.”

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A Sad Life (Don't take off the Mask)

Lula

"People don’t see the real me. They don’t look hard enough. They just see a weirdo when all I’m doing is enjoying myself jumping in puddles, collecting stones and playing. I wish people could see me like I see myself. I don’t want to rush them but if they don’t hurry up and change I’m going to be really lonely. I mean I just don’t want to feel shamed and left in lots of peoples shadows." Lula, 17 non-binary and autistic.

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Abstract 3

Louise

Originally from East Yorkshire and living with Bi Polar. Invisibility for me is quite strong. I’ve lived in London for 22 years and the cultural difference has lead me to feel lonely, isolated and invisible. I lead a quiet life and spend a lot of time alone.

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Alien 2

Fabrizio

Even the most visible people can feel invisible. I’m a foreigner gay guy, grown up in a small village in the middle of Sardinia and happily adopted by London 10 years ago. Since I was a kid I’ve always felt different, felt not seen for who I really was. With time your mask becomes you, and you lose touch with the person within, so even through the years that feeling sometimes emerges. Despite the big achievements in the past 20 years, being gay is still complex. It eradicates to a subtle but omnipresent shame of who we really are. We seek attention and validation to fulfil what is missing, what we never had from society, that’s why I/we feel invisible.

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Banana

HIP

Hackney Independent Parent Carer Forum (HiP) - a group of parents in Hackney who volunteer to connect to the wider SEND community. The artwork presented has been submitted by their Autism Girls Group HiP, from an eclectic group of Children and Young People with additional needs.

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Blue Lady

Sana

Sana is a South Asian artist, poet, designer and flower enthusiast, living In Hackney. When not painting she runs a poetry newsletter called Found Poems. It took a long time for her to find her way back to art in the absence of seeing visible examples of Indian artists being active and celebrated in the London art scene. She hopes that by sharing her work she can be that visible sign for others looking to commit to art.

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By Dandy - 1

Dandy

I am a multidisciplinary artist whose practice was subjected to an unforeseen shift after the sudden loss of my mother in 2019. Forced to discover the multi-faceted powers of grief and loss, my approach has since evolved into an autobiographical glimpse of childhood and identity pre- and post- my mother’s passing.

I believe grief can make one feel invisible. Perhaps when you're at the pub, grabbing a coffee, having a browse in a shop, grief is always bearing heavy on your shoulders. I wanted to submit my paintings to this art trail because I believe in this setting my paintings will reflect how grief can be overlooked on a daily basis.

My most recent painting series comes from youtube screenshots of the world gymnastic final in 1975. In the footage, somewhere far in the distance, you can occasionally get a glimpse of my mother; a very blurry ten year old runner for the event. These low quality pictures/paintings had a haunting impact on me as I try to digest life and death in one image.

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By Dandy - 4

Dandy

I am a multidisciplinary artist whose practice was subjected to an unforeseen shift after the sudden loss of my mother in 2019. Forced to discover the multi-faceted powers of grief and loss, my approach has since evolved into an autobiographical glimpse of childhood and identity pre- and post- my mother’s passing.

I believe grief can make one feel invisible. Perhaps when you're at the pub, grabbing a coffee, having a browse in a shop, grief is always bearing heavy on your shoulders. I wanted to submit my paintings to this art trail because I believe in this setting my paintings will reflect how grief can be overlooked on a daily basis.

My most recent painting series comes from youtube screenshots of the world gymnastic final in 1975. In the footage, somewhere far in the distance, you can occasionally get a glimpse of my mother; a very blurry ten year old runner for the event. These low quality pictures/paintings had a haunting impact on me as I try to digest life and death in one image.